Original research

Incidence, causes and factors associated with torso injury in Cameroon: A community-based study

E Wepngong, S A Christie, Rasheedat Oke, G Motwani, W Chendjou, K Azemafac, F M Ahmed Nour, D Dickson, R Dicker, C Juillard, A Chichom-Mefire

Abstract


Background. Morbidity and mortality linked to injury has become an increasingly important public health concern worldwide, especially in developing countries. Despite the potentially severe nature of torso injury, little is known about the population-based epidemiology of torso injury in sub-Saharan Africa.

Objectives. To determine the incidence, identify common mechanisms, and assess the socioeconomic consequences of torso injury in Cameroon.

Methods. We performed a torso injury sub-analysis of a larger descriptive cross-sectional community-based study on injury epidemiology in the preceding 12 months in the Southwest region of Cameroon. Sampling was done using the three-stage cluster sampling technique. The differences between groups were evaluated using χ2 and adjusted Wald tests.

Results. We identified 39 cases of torso injuries out of 8 065 participants, providing a yearly incidence estimate of 488 (95% confidence interval (CI) 356 - 668) per 100 000 person-years. Road traffic injury was the most common mechanism of torso injury. The median (interquartile range (IQR)) cost of treatment for torso injury was USD58 (10 - 137), over four times the median (IQR) cost for non-torso injury at USD12 (3 - 43) (p=0.0004). About half of affected households (51%) reported being unable to afford necessities such as rent and food after injury v. 33% of households with members with non-torso injuries (p=0.018).

Conclusion. Torso injuries have an incidence of 488/100 000 person-years, and road traffic injuries account for the majority of the injuries. Road traffic control measures and trauma care strengthening may reduce the impact of torso injuries and injuries in Cameroon. Keywords. torso injury; global surgery; injury; socioeconomic impact; road traffic injuries; cost of care; developing countries; Cameroon


Authors' affiliations

E Wepngong, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon; Center for Global Surgical Studies, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA

S A Christie, Center for Global Surgical Studies, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA

Rasheedat Oke, University of California, Los Angeles

G Motwani, Center for Global Surgical Studies, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA

W Chendjou, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon; Center for Global Surgical Studies, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA

K Azemafac, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon; Center for Global Surgical Studies, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA

F M Ahmed Nour, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon; Center for Global Surgical Studies, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA

D Dickson, Center for Global Surgical Studies, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA

R Dicker, Program for the Advancement of Surgical Equity, Department of Surgery, University of California Los Angeles, California, USA

C Juillard, Program for the Advancement of Surgical Equity, Department of Surgery, University of California Los Angeles, California, USA

A Chichom-Mefire, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon

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Cite this article

African Journal of Thoracic and Critical Care Medicine 2021;27(3):106-111. DOI:10.7196/AJTCCM.2021.v27i3.161

Article History

Date submitted: 2021-10-01
Date published: 2021-10-04

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African Journal of Thoracic and Critical Care Medicine| Online ISSN: 2617-0205

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